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13 November 2017

Recovery is a fun game at Sevenoaks Hospital

In the pictures: Ward Sister Kiran Dhillon, patients Eunice Webb and David Emmett and Physiotherapist Mansi Gupta playing Jenga.

In the pictures: Ward Sister Kiran Dhillon, patients Eunice Webb and David Emmett and Physiotherapist Mansi Gupta playing Jenga.

Jenga, skittles, dominoes and draughts are the name of the game for a forward-thinking rehabilitation team based at Sevenoaks Hospital.

The team, run by Kent Community Health NHS Foundation Trust, has introduced a series of garden games to the therapy room to make recovery fun for their patients.

Over-sized traditional games encourage patients to stand, work on their balance and support their posture at the same time as enjoying themselves during their time in hospital.

The brainchild of Occupational Therapist Judith Strudwick, the games were bought thanks to a generous £300 donation from the Sevenoaks League of Friends.

Patient Eunice Webb, 87, from Maidstone, had been a patient on Stanhope Ward for five weeks before her discharge. Eunice was admitted to the hospital after a chest infection and pneumonia led to her having a fall at home. She said: “It’s been absolutely brilliant here. It’s like being in a five star hotel and they couldn’t be kinder. The games are good fun and remind me of things I have played with my grandchildren.”

David Emmett, also from Maidstone, agreed. The 78-year-old was admitted for physical therapy on his swollen legs – a result of the cancer treatment he is receiving.

He said: “I have only been here a week but it’s been great. I had reduced mobility, but I can tell I have improved already and getting up to play the games is helping.”

Ward Sister Kiran Dhillon, said: “We are really grateful to the League of Friends for its donation. The games are fantastic and are really making a difference to the experience our patients have when they are with us.

“We are here to help them physically recover, but it’s also important to support their mental wellbeing too and the games make sure they are socialising and interacting with one another.”